Holland Museum to offer insight into discriminatory housing practices

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Discriminatory housing practices will be discussed in the next installment of Holland Museum’s Cultural Lens series.

The two free, virtual programs take place Thursday and March 18.

The Fair Housing Center of West Michigan will provide copies of “Fair Housing Five and the Haunted House” in English or Spanish and offer activities to families who register by March 10. Courtesy Holland Museum

“Museums do more than keep and house the past; they are active participants in current events,” said Michelle Stempien, the museum’s education and community programs manager. “As dialogues on diversity, equity, access and inclusion continue throughout our community, the Holland Museum is pleased to contribute these two programs about fair housing practices to the conversation. It is especially important to discuss this topic with children and their families as young people will be the future leaders and changemakers in the struggle to create safe and equitable spaces for BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ members of our community.”

The first program, Fair Housing: A Historical Overview, is scheduled for 7-8:30 p.m. Thursday. Hope College professor Dr. Fred Johnson and Liz Keegan from Fair Housing Center of West Michigan will share a history of how housing segregation and discriminatory housing policies such as redlining continue to have an impact.

From 6-7 p.m. March 18, there will be a reading and discussion of the book “Fair Housing Five and the Haunted House” led in English by Bree Miranda of Fair Housing Center of West Michigan and in Spanish by Brisa Martinez-Contreras.

The Fair Housing Center of West Michigan will provide copies of the book in English or Spanish and offer activities to families who register by March 10.

To register for the free programs, visit Holland Museum’s website.

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